A taste of the Kitchen ethos

Have a taste
of our ethics.

At Kitchen, we believe in ethics—in great results coming from sound, persistent practices and conduct. With our own creative experiences and inspired by fellow chefs of the world, we've crafted a series of professional expectations, assumptions and pearls of wisdom. Here are some of them. Enjoy.

Before we actually start anything…

A huge part of any chef's day is their prep because it sets them up for an entire service's worth of actual cooking. Ultimately, mise is about efficiency—each station being able to execute dishes flawlessly, in the least amount of time, with the least amount of exertion.

Whether it's baking cookies, creating a logo or piloting a jet, mise en place is a concept we can apply all over our daily lives before getting to the meat of a task, and we're always glad we did.

Bring your appetite.

Virgin boss Sir Richard Branson enjoying the party on the airline's inaugural trip to Las Vegas in 2000.

Ironically, we feed off of hunger. We're attracted to your zest and your zeal. We want to be inspired and to inspire others. We want to take big bites out of life and to obliterate the status quo. If you can bring that, your excitement will spread and make for the kind of work and times that people remember.

Virgin boss Sir Richard Branson enjoying the party on the airline's inaugural trip to Las Vegas in 2000.

Know-it-alls: not for us.

We're not big on generalists or people who bite off more than they can chew for the sake of ego. We believe in teams. The people who interest us—who we want to be around—are those who understand and perform their role expertly to achieve a greater goal together. We're proud of what we're good at and happy to work with people who bring different skills to the table.

If given lemons, make…
something else.

There are literally millions of recipes we can make with lemons; why would we ever settle for lemonade?

Taste as you go and improve what you can along the way.

Taste as you go and improve what you can along the way.

A dish is not finished until it's on the table/in front of a client. So before calling anything a wrap, we taste, we sample, we fine tune, we tweak here and add finishing touches there. Along the journey of creation, we must taste "everything" to make sure it's to our standards of craftsmanship and quality. Consider it an exercise in staying humble while ensuring excellence.

Have a sharp knife at all times.

Have a sharp knife at all times.

Our work requires precision and accuracy. We're careful in selecting our tools, exacting in our technique and intolerant of inexactitude. A dull knife is an insult to our process. The same goes for dull minds. Our heads must constantly be alert, aware and focused on developing and refining that perfect idea. There are no coincidences when you create—just readiness.

Maintain a sense of urgency. Be fast, but never sloppy.

Maintain a sense of urgency.
Be fast,
but never sloppy.

We do not sacrifice quality for speed.
We do not sacrifice speed for quality.
We stay prepared to deliver both.

We do not sacrifice quality for speed. We do not sacrifice speed for quality. We stay prepared to deliver both.

Sweat the details.

Sweat the details.

A flawless dish can be ruined by poor plating. The ultimate judgement of our work will always rest on the details.

Be like water.

Be like water.

Bruce Lee once said: "When you pour water in a cup, it becomes the cup. When you pour water in a bottle, it becomes the bottle. When you pour water in a teapot, it becomes the teapot. Water can drip and it can crash. Become like water, my friend."

Every team plays a bit differently. Joining a new one means adjusting to a new situation and a new way of working. Making those adjustments—dedicating yourself to that way of working—is what makes you part of the team.

Focus on one single dish at a time.

Focus on
one single dish
at a time.

We hone our ability to see clearly through the fog and smoke of the kitchen and prioritize as necessary. Though we may have five things cooking for a client, each thing demands our sole focus while we attend to it. In the chaos of multiple assignments and orders, we must develop a second nature for which dish goes out next and what each one requires of us.

Never stop learning, regardless of how much you think you already know.

Never stop learning,
regardless of
how much you think
you already know.

Never stop learning,
regardless of
how much
you think you already know.

Be a sponge. A sponge is someone who is tirelessly driven to seek and absorb new information. A sponge learns from mentors, advisors and peers, studies heroes and reads voraciously.

Albert Einstein—a perfect example of a non-kitchen-bound chef—said, "once you stop learning, you start dying."

Hoping to forestall death, we try to put our egos aside on occasion to stop and look around us to see what others are doing, how they're doing it, and how we might draw inspiration from one another. Whatever we've accomplished or have yet to accomplish, we want to stay curious and open about new ideas, techniques and tools that can help us be better.

Be a sponge. A sponge is someone who is tirelessly driven to seek and absorb new information. A sponge learns from mentors, advisors and peers, studies heroes and reads voraciously.

Our job is to spread happiness.

Our job is
to spread happiness.

Elsa Schiaparelli, Italian fashion designer, Coco Chanel rival, legend, once said: "A chef is like a sorceress who dispenses happiness."

Our job isn't just to achieve customer satisfaction. Even those two words strung together sound alien and impersonal. We want people smiling. We want them overcome with delight.

Make this world a better place, however you chef.

Get the complete Kitchen ethos manual here.

That’s why we turned our manual into a book, to have them go beyond our team members.
The Kitchen ethos can influence everybody's life and work in a positive way. It is a perfect guide to moral daily living.